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Optimizing Communication in African Oncology Settings – Breaking Down Barriers, Creating Connections, Optimizing Outcomes

20 Aug 2019 4:23 PM | John Chagnon (Administrator)

2019 IPOS Academy in Maputo, Mozambique

Overall Goal: To train attendees on best-practices around communication in African oncology settings

IPOS has developed, in close partnership with our colleagues in Africa and in collaboration with AORTIC, an Academy on the theme of Optimizing Communication in African Oncology Settings. The goal of this Academy is to train attendees on evidence-based practices around communication to reduce suffering and social stigma as main barriers to early detection and treatment of cancer in African oncology settings. The Academy will use a combination of didactic seminars, hands-on training exercises, and roundtable discussions, in which participants will be encouraged to discuss knowledge translation as it relates to public policy, research, clinical, and training, as well as outline needs for collaboration in these areas (see preliminary program attached).

We are accepting applications from health care professionals working in direct contact with cancer patients in Mozambique and in neighbouring countries, to attend the 2019 IPOS Academy in Maputo, Mozambique. Fees for the Academy will be waived, and applications will be accepted on a first come first serve basis. Kindly send your CV to [email protected], accompanied by a completed and signed checklist.

Our Organization:

IPOS is the sole multidisciplinary international charitable organization devoted to psycho-oncology, leading in education, research, training, public policy, and advocacy. In 2014, IPOS celebrated its 30th anniversary and began a partnership with the World Health Organization. Part of our mandate is to build capacity for cancer care in low- and low-middle income countries including in Africa. IPOS includes 100+ member countries from 6 continents.

Full eligibility criteria for the application (please note that all criteria must be met):

  • Be a professional working in direct contact with cancer patients in Africa;
  • Conduct clinical work in a field appropriate to the field of psycho-oncology (e.g., physicians, nurses, psychologists, social workers, occupational therapist);
  • Be fluent in oral English. The Academy will be conducted in English;
  • Be eligible to obtain a Visa from Mozambique if a Visa is required;
  • Commit to attend the two-day Academy on November 3-4, 2019;
  • Commit to sharing the knowledge learned through the Academy to professionals in your city and country in Africa;
  • Commit to arrange and pay for your own travel and accommodation;
  • Assume responsibility for your safety and physical health during your travels to and from the Academy as well as during the Academy.

HOW TO SUBMIT THE APPLICATION?

It is the responsibility of the applicant to ensure the application is complete. Incomplete applications or handwritten applications will be automatically withdrawn from the contest without notice. Applications will only be accepted if they are received at your earliest convenience before September 20, 2019 to the following e-mail address: [email protected]. Applications must include the checklist and a five-page Curriculum Vitae for the applicant.

IPOS Academy – Maputo, Mozambique

IPOS holds non-state actor status with the World Health Organization (WHO)

Theme: Optimizing Doctor-Patient Communication in African Oncology Settings

Overall Goal: Train attendees on evidence-based practices around communication to reduce suffering and social stigma as main barriers to early detection and treatment of cancer in African oncology settings.

Methods: The Academy will use a combination of didactic seminars and roundtable discussions, in which participants will be encouraged to discuss knowledge translation of communication skills as it relates to public policy, research, clinical, and training, as well as outline needs for collaboration in these areas.

Day 1:

Opening Comments from Co-Chairs Dr. Melissa Henry and Dr. Chioma Asuzu and distinguished representatives

Importance of communication and screening for distress

  • a.     Improving cancer outcomes in Africa through communication skills and strategies (Dr. Chioma Asuzu)
  • b.     Screening for distress as an essential tool to communication (Drs. Melissa Henry)
  • c.     Review of conceptual models of doctor-patient communication and the shared-decision making model (Dr. Elizabeth Akin-Odanye, Nigeria; Dr. Joyce Terwase, Nigeria)

Barriers around communicating bad news to patients and families in African oncology settings: Results of a World Café and pan-African survey indicating similarities with barriers to prevention and the need for concerted strategic planning (Dr. Melissa Henry, Montreal, Canada; Dr. David Lounsbury, New York, USA)

Morning Break

A family-systems approach to communication and how to communicate with children in an age-appropriate way (Dr. Chioma Asuzu, Nigeria; Dr. Luzia Travado, Lisbon, Portugal)

The importance of family-centered communication in the context of African medical oncology practice: A palliative care physician’s perspective (Dr. Christian Ntizimira, Kigali, Rwanda)

LUNCH

Evidenced-based strategies to address beliefs/stigma: A literature review and model

Round table discussion – World Café discussion on addressing knowledge, beliefs, and stigma to reduce delayed presentation and treatment onset in Africa. Goal: Initiate a discussion on structural and public health changes required in Africa and the role of IPOS and Association of Psycho-Oncology in Africa (APOA) (Drs. Scott and Sharon Nichols, California, USA; Phillip Odiyo, Kenya; Dr. Chioma Asuzu, Nigeria; Dr. Melissa Henry, Canada).

Closing remarks for Day 1

Day 2: Doctor-Patient Communication Skills Training Day – featuring Dr. Patricia Parker and Dr. Smita Banerjee, Communication Skills Training and Research Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering, New York; and Dr. Luzia Travado, Champalimaud Clinical Center, Lisbon, Portugal

Overview: 

Effective communication is essential for the optimal delivery of healthcare services. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has developed an evidence-based, robust program in communication skills training with a mission “to work in partnership with clinicians of all disciplines to improve communication with cancer patients and their families, and thus enhance overall adaptation to the illness.” The overall objective of the Communication Skills Training and Research Laboratory is to develop, evaluate and disseminate communication skills interventions (The Comskil Training Program) for health care professionals and patients to communicate more effectively. The Comskil Training Program provides a unique training opportunity with a dedicated staff of communication skills facilitators, standardized patient actors, and customized laboratory space including training rooms equipped with video recording and playback equipment. Training modules have been developed to address high priority communication challenges in the oncology setting such as Shared Decision Making, Introducing Palliative Care, and Discussing End-of-Life Goals of Care. The training program relies on a multidisciplinary approach to the delivery of communication skills training, with more than 90 trained facilitators at the institution. The Comskil Training Program is taught to oncology attending physicians, fellows, residents, nurses and nurse practitioners. Since the inception of the Comskil training program in 2005, more than 4,000 oncology health care providers have participated in this program.  

Opening Comments from Co-Chairs Dr. Melissa Henry and Dr. Chioma Asuzu

Introduction to the Comskil Conceptual Model 

Shared Decision Making (SDM) Didactic 

SDM Fishbowl/Role Play 

Break 

Responding to Patient Anger Didactic 

Lunch 

Responding to Patient Anger Fishbowl/Role Play 

Break 

Discussing Death, Dying and End of Life Goals of Care Didactic – In Africa 80% of cancers are diagnosed in advanced stage

Discussing Death, Dying and End of Life Goals of Care Fishbowl/Role Play 

Debrief and Discussion. 

Closing remarks for Day 2 (speaker)

International Psycho-Oncology Society
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